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Thread: The state of the world!

  1. #21
    Neophyte Sorcerer
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    You don't even need to look at uk inner citys, I live in a smallish town and most weeks the police are sorting out some sort of trouble.Only a few weeks ago the guy opposite me got his front door kicked in,seems to have been somebody he'd upset.

  2. #22
    Acolyte
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonRimmer View Post
    To be honest mate a vast majority in the UK would rather have our NHS than the american system, we may moan about it but he average Joe doesn't wan tit o go like the US version. Only those with a vested interest (money) would want it to change.
    He's right. The British tendency to moan at just about everything shouldn't be confused with any appetite for radical change to something most people are very satisfied with, if they can concentrate long enough on considering medical care rather than the cost of hospital TV or whether the custard is cold.


    Herston, the country and our youth is getting more violent than ever. I reckon it's going the other way. You only have to live in the inner city to see the state of society. That programme recently following the police was the best police programme I've watched and boy was it depressing you could see the despair in them with the way things are going in the inner cities. Coppers it was called. Once they start doing the police cut backs god knows how things are going to go.
    If you live in an inner city, you see the state of society in an inner city. Been there, done that, although not at present. In terms of what I'm saying, though, are the streets of 21st Century London really more violent than those of medieval London or Victorian London? Or even mid-late 20th Century London, when people were saying exactly the same things you are now? I very much doubt it. There will always be ups and downs but the general trend is the other way. Evolution is a long term process.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Childress View Post
    Interesting. In a sense doesn't that sort of mean there is a slow "geno-cide" or extinction going on against those genes that possess the aggressive trait? And if there is, some may say it's a good thing, but a good thing for who?
    Everybody, ultimately. What gets wiped up is what does not benefit survival. I suppose you could introduce the Star Trek stuff and say we always need an element of aggression to drive us into success and new endeavours etc., etc., which is probably true, but the distinction is pretty clear.
    Last edited by Hertston; 05-22-2012 at 07:10 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by parusski View Post
    As a dedicated conservative I hope you did not just say we are comfortable kicking people out of hospitals. People are given time limits on hospital stays, insured or not. Just as in England there must be limits. I am very familiar with the American, Canadian and British systems, since my wife is a doctor. I have been with her on seminar visits to both Canada and England, and in both countries seen and heard from as many, if not more, detractors of how they do health care.
    I don't want to get too hung up on one issue as I've no experience of the US medical system or indeed the country as a whole (making my first visit next year, actually). My general point, though, is the hypocrisy between advocating almost total freedom in some spheres of life while denying some fundamental freedoms in others, apparently (stripped of any ideological or religious pseudo-argument) solely on the basis of disapproval and assumed moral superiority.
    Last edited by Hertston; 05-22-2012 at 07:11 PM.

  4. #24
    Mage’s Assistant
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    Lightbulb

    My response to you was clumsy, you have NEVER offended me. My opinion that a mostly private system is preferable to mostly public is based on many factors. I have watched my wife, and her physician friends, practice in an ever increasingly federally regulated system over the last 18 years. Every new federal, or State, regulation, law or idea has been, largely, bad.

    One fallacy repeated over and over is that there are 48 million uninsured in the US. Not exactly: 10 million are illegal's, so not eligible. 17 million make more than 50,000 per year and can afford insurance and about 13 million of them choose NOT to buy insurance. About 12 million are eligible for existing medicare or medicaid programs,(OR were under 32 and choose not to buy insurance) but have not applied. These figures account for approximately 41 million of that 48 million uninsured number. So, we actually have around 7 million who are TRULY without insurance. It would be best if ONLY the truly uninsured were covered, not the entire nation. Americans are never denied medical treatment. Just visit any emergency room and you can get treated for a heart attack, acid reflux or the flu. Finally, the Congressional Budget Office and the Department of Human Services both estimate that 36,000,000 Americans would remain uninsured IF we implement the current plan. We should never argue whether people should or should not be covered, instead we need to focus on facts and find solutions for those actually in need.

  5. #25
    Administrator Administrator
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    We pay national insurance through our wages.

  6. #26
    I think the crux of the problem is that politicians only care about winning the next election. So they promise voters whatever they want to get elected and then just print money to cover the cost. The politicians don't care because when the shit finally hits the fan they will be long gone. As long as they get votes NOW, they don't care what happens in 20 years when the entire economy collapses. They'll have gold plated healthcare and pensions for themselves and family by then.

    Look no further than the recent elections in Europe. Instead of cutting back on spending they just doubled down on big government and entitlements. Now it seems Germany is the last stand for sensibility and Merkel is in trouble.

    Europe is lucky, they can kick Greece, Spain, Italy and Portugal out (and possibly even France?) to save the Euro. America can't just boot California and the rest of the welfare states.

  7. #27
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    Politicians care about Power and bigger pay packets. Simple.

  8. #28
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    GordianKnot you are right about the politicians.

    Here are two prophetic statements that are so true:

    “The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.”
    ― Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America


    AND:

    “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising the most benefits from the public treasury with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy, always followed by a dictatorship. The average age of the world's greatest civilizations has been 200 years.”
    ― Alexis de Tocqueville

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by GordianKnot View Post
    Europe is lucky, they can kick Greece, Spain, Italy and Portugal out (and possibly even France?) to save the Euro. America can't just boot California and the rest of the welfare states.
    No. Europe, the ECB and the Euro zone can't just kick out all of these players. Maybe it will come to that with Greece, but it just won't / can't work for Spain or Italy. Too damn big. If / when Greece leaves the Euro zone, it will be a terrible shock to the currency.

    When contrasted with the European system, I'd much rather have ours. California is in a tough spot and it's up to them to lie in their own bed. The federal government *may* help somewhat, but the private market (California bonds) and Californians will be left holding the bag. It will suck for them, but we (I'm a California native) can 'vote with our feet' and go elsewhere where the jobs are, the government isn't whacked out of their gord and the cost of living isn't as high.

  10. #30
    In general, I'm an optimist. American civil society is considerably less violent than it was even 15 years ago. The reasons are varied (depends on who wants to take credit for it), but indisputable. Homicide, youth violence, rape and assault are all down substantially. I think homicide per se is down to levels last seen in the 1960s (on a per capita basis).

    Internationally, I think it would be hard to replicate (on a per capita basis) the human pain and suffering associated with historical famines, war, disease and open genocide. By comparison to the 20th century alone, we live in an oasis of peace on this world.

    I know, it doesn't sound like we're at peace and at the pinnacle of longevity, but we are. Some historical perspective is necessary. Evolution as a species is a long process. In general (there are some exceptions), we're doing OK.

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