After talking about Traveler etc I decided to do a Google and came across Mongoose publishing who seem to publish boardgames and RPG's including Traveler.

http://www.mongoosepublishing.com/

Also they publish an RPG which sounds a great game to play pretty much anywhere if you have the friends or family and better after a few pints I expect.

It's called...

The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Von Munchausen. Below is a Shut up and Sit down review of said RPG...oh he had just reviewed Star trek Fleet Captains...

rpg.jpg

"The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Tell you something else about Star Trek: Fleet Captains. The manual is an abomination. Baron Munchausen, on the other hand, has (or, more accurately, is) the best rulebook Ive ever encountered.

Baron Munchausen is a game of story telling. Youre all Victorian nobles talking of your wild and absurd exploits, and each round begins with one player turning to another and saying, say, Tell us, Baron [Your friends name here]. Is it not true you once escaped from the Irish army riding half a horse? Or whatever other miserable opener you can dream up.

Its then up to your poor friend to tell this story, with all the other players chiming in whenever they like to confuse matters. You fled under a hair of gunfire? But how is that possible, sir? It is well known that you have no stamina for running. Whereupon the (already sweating) storyteller will either have to factor this into their story, deny it, or produce a counter-challenge.

At this point I should probably mention that the manual heavily encourages drinking throughout (a drink must be downed before a challenge can be raised), making this the first game Shut Up & Sit Down has looked at which is best played in a bar. The first of many, hopefully.

There are a handful of more concrete rules involved in this that see players gaining and losing points, or, if a dispute becomes too heated, dueling (which takes the form of three rounds of rock-paper-scissors), but its the talking and quick-thinking that matters. Ive never played anything quite like it, which makes me love it by default, and then youve got the manual.

Oh man. Its 107 pages long because its written by the baron himself, who is, of course, a legendary talker. Heres an excerpt.

When all is done with their stories, there should be a moment of pause. Sit back in your chair and permit the pot-boy to recharge your glass. Think on the stories you have heard, and decide in your own mind which was the best. If you are of a scholarly bent you may wish to debate the matter with your companions, making reference to Aristotles Ars Poetica and the recent critical works of the poet Dryden. Or if not, then not. Tis of small importance.

107 pages of this. Also a two page appendix at the back containing The rules in brief. If thats not an immediate impulse buy for you, the manual also includes a variant, Es-Sindibads Rules, which is similar but with an adorable Arabian twist that sees players all demanding a different part of a story be told (and gaining points if the story teller forgets their request), and Allah is thanked for every fortuitous turn in the tale.

Its just such a wonderful device to help you have fun with your friends, which, personally speaking, is exactly why Im into board gaming. You can bet Ill be playing this one in the pub for decades to come.

Right. Thats enough of that. Time to hunt Paul down and put together another family-size, meticulously researched review of something. Something with frightening accuracy but no fear. Something worthy of you, beautiful reader.

And I think I have just the game"